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Challenge both your English & minds





2012-02-24 08:32:50|  分类: Lectures |  标签: |举报 |字号 订阅

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61. I should like to rent a house, modern, comfortable and _____ in a quiet neighborhood.

A) all in all                                        C) after all

B) above all                                            D) over all

62. _____ we have finished the course, we shall start doing more revision work.

A) For now                                            C) Ever since

B) Now that                                           D) By now

63. What you have done is _____ the doctor's orders.

A) attached to                                        C) resistant to

B) responsible to                                    D) contrary to

64. John regretted _____ to the meeting last week.

A) not going                                           C) not having been going

B) not to go                                           D) not to be going

65. They _____ in spite of the extremely difficult conditions.

A) carried out                                         C) carried on

B) carried off                                         D) carried forward


Woz spent a lot of time at home reading his father’s electronics _______[journal], and he became enthralled by stories about new computers, such as the powerful ENIAC. Because Boolean algebra came naturally to him, he marveled at how simple, rather than complex, the computers were. In eighth grade he built a calculator that included one hundred transistors, two hundred diodes, and two hundred resistors on ten circuit boards. It won top prize in a local contest_______[run]   by the Air Force, even though the competitors included students through twelfth grade.

Woz became more of a loner when the boys his age began going out with girls and partying, endeavors that he found far more complex _______ designing circuits. “Where before I was popular and riding bikes and everything, suddenly I was socially shut out,” he recalled. “It seemed like nobody spoke to me for the longest time.” He found an outlet by playing juvenile pranks. In twelfth grade he built an electronic metronome—one of those tick-tick-tick devices that keep time in music class—and realized it sounded like a bomb. So he took the labels off some big batteries, taped them together, and put it in a school locker; he rigged it to start ticking faster when the locker opened. Later that day he got _______[call] to the principal’s office. He thought it was because he had won, yet again, the school’s top math prize. Instead he was confronted by the police. The principal had been summoned when the device was found, bravely ran onto the football field clutching it to his chest, and pulled the wires off. Woz tried and failed to suppress his laughter. He actually got sent to the juvenile detention center, where he spent the night. It was a memorable experience. He taught the other prisoners how to disconnect the wires leading to the ceiling fans and connect them to the bars so people got shocked when _______[touch] them.

Getting shocked was a badge of honor for Woz. He prided himself on being a hardware engineer, which meant that random shocks were routine. He once devised a roulette game where four people put their thumbs in a slot; when the ball landed, one would get shocked. “Hardware guys will play this game, but software guys are too chicken,” he noted.


During his senior year he got a part-time job at Sylvania and had the chance to work on a computer for the first time. He learned FORTRAN from a book and read the manuals for most of the systems of the day, starting with the Digital Equipment PDP-8. Then he studied the specs for the latest microchips and tried to redesign the computers using these newer parts. The challenge he set himself was to replicate the design using the fewest components possible. Each night he would try to improve his drawing from _______ night before. By the end of his senior year, he _______[become] a master. “I was now designing computers with half the number of chips the actual company had in their own design, but only on paper.” He never told his friends. After all, most seventeen-year-olds were getting their kicks in other ways.












61. B   62. B   63. D   64. A   65. C










had become


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