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英语练功房

Challenge both your English & minds

 
 
 

日志

 
 

0224  

2012-02-24 08:32:50|  分类: Lectures |  标签: |举报 |字号 订阅

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61. I should like to rent a house, modern, comfortable and _____ in a quiet neighborhood.

A) all in all                                        C) after all

B) above all                                            D) over all

62. _____ we have finished the course, we shall start doing more revision work.

A) For now                                            C) Ever since

B) Now that                                           D) By now

63. What you have done is _____ the doctor's orders.

A) attached to                                        C) resistant to

B) responsible to                                    D) contrary to

64. John regretted _____ to the meeting last week.

A) not going                                           C) not having been going

B) not to go                                           D) not to be going

65. They _____ in spite of the extremely difficult conditions.

A) carried out                                         C) carried on

B) carried off                                         D) carried forward

 

Woz spent a lot of time at home reading his father’s electronics _______[journal], and he became enthralled by stories about new computers, such as the powerful ENIAC. Because Boolean algebra came naturally to him, he marveled at how simple, rather than complex, the computers were. In eighth grade he built a calculator that included one hundred transistors, two hundred diodes, and two hundred resistors on ten circuit boards. It won top prize in a local contest_______[run]   by the Air Force, even though the competitors included students through twelfth grade.

Woz became more of a loner when the boys his age began going out with girls and partying, endeavors that he found far more complex _______ designing circuits. “Where before I was popular and riding bikes and everything, suddenly I was socially shut out,” he recalled. “It seemed like nobody spoke to me for the longest time.” He found an outlet by playing juvenile pranks. In twelfth grade he built an electronic metronome—one of those tick-tick-tick devices that keep time in music class—and realized it sounded like a bomb. So he took the labels off some big batteries, taped them together, and put it in a school locker; he rigged it to start ticking faster when the locker opened. Later that day he got _______[call] to the principal’s office. He thought it was because he had won, yet again, the school’s top math prize. Instead he was confronted by the police. The principal had been summoned when the device was found, bravely ran onto the football field clutching it to his chest, and pulled the wires off. Woz tried and failed to suppress his laughter. He actually got sent to the juvenile detention center, where he spent the night. It was a memorable experience. He taught the other prisoners how to disconnect the wires leading to the ceiling fans and connect them to the bars so people got shocked when _______[touch] them.

Getting shocked was a badge of honor for Woz. He prided himself on being a hardware engineer, which meant that random shocks were routine. He once devised a roulette game where four people put their thumbs in a slot; when the ball landed, one would get shocked. “Hardware guys will play this game, but software guys are too chicken,” he noted.

 

During his senior year he got a part-time job at Sylvania and had the chance to work on a computer for the first time. He learned FORTRAN from a book and read the manuals for most of the systems of the day, starting with the Digital Equipment PDP-8. Then he studied the specs for the latest microchips and tried to redesign the computers using these newer parts. The challenge he set himself was to replicate the design using the fewest components possible. Each night he would try to improve his drawing from _______ night before. By the end of his senior year, he _______[become] a master. “I was now designing computers with half the number of chips the actual company had in their own design, but only on paper.” He never told his friends. After all, most seventeen-year-olds were getting their kicks in other ways.

 

沃兹花了大量的时间在家阅读父亲的电子学期刊,他着迷于关于新式计算机的那些故事,比如强大的埃尼阿克(ENIAC)。在接触到布尔代数之后,他惊奇地发现其实计算机系统一点儿也不复杂,而是非常简单。八年级的时候,他基于二进制理论造出了一台计算器,把100只晶体管、200只二极管、200只电阻装在了10块电路板上。在当地一项由空军举办的赛事上,尽管参赛者中还有十二年级的学生,但这台计算器还是赢得了最高奖。

    与沃兹同龄的男孩已开始跟女孩约会、参加各种派对,而他觉得这些都比设计电路更为复杂,他显得更加不合群了。“之前我还挺受欢迎的,但突然间我就被孤立了,”他回忆说,“很长的一段时间都没有人跟我说话。”他找到了一个发泄的办法:搞些幼稚的恶作剧。高中四年级的时候,他做了一个电子节拍器——音乐教室里用来打拍子的、会发出“滴答”声的装置——然后他意识到“滴答”声听上去很像是炸弹定时器的声音。于是他一些大块电池的标签撕掉,把它们绑在一起,然后放进了学校的储物柜里。他设定好装置,一旦柜门被打开,“滴答”频率就会变高。那天晚些时候,他被叫到了校长办公室。他还以为是因为他又一次获得了学校的最高数学奖。然而,等待他的是警察。校长布吕德先生(Mr.Bryld)在装置刚被发现时就被叫到了现场,他一把抓起那个玩意儿,紧贴胸口,抱着它勇敢地跑到了操场,然后把上面的电线拆掉。沃兹强忍着,但还是控制不住笑了出来。那天他真的被送到了青少年拘留中心,在那儿过丁一晚上。沃兹认为那是一段难忘的经历。他在里面教其他犯人把通到天花板上风扇的电线接到铁窗上,这样一且有人碰到就会被电击一下。

    对沃兹来说,被电击就好像是获得荣誉奖章一样。作为一名硬件工程师让他很自豪,但这也意味着触电是家常便饭。他曾经发明过一种轮盘赌游戏:四个人把拇指按在槽里,球落下之后,其中的一个会被电到。“搞硬件的人才愿意玩这个游戏,搞软件的都太胆小了。”他这么强调

    到了高中四年级,他在喜万年公司(Sylvania)得到了一份兼职工作,人生中第一次有机会在计算机前工作。他从书上自学了FORTRAN语言,并阅读了当时大多数电子系统的使用说明,从数字设备公司(DigitalEquipment)的:PDP-8开始。之后,他研究了最新的微芯片的规格,开始使用这些最新的元器件重新设计计算机。他为自己定的挑战是:使用最少的元器件来实现。“我关上房门,在自己的房间里独自完成了这项工作。”他回忆说。每天晚上,他都会努力在前一天的基础上进一步完善自己的设计。到四年级结束时,他已经成为这方面的专家了。“我设计的计算机,使用的芯片数量只有市面上产品中芯片数量的一半,但我的设计还停留在图纸上。”他从没有跟他的朋友提到过这些。毕竟,大多数17岁的孩子都在忙着干其他事情。

 

 

 

 

 

 

61. B   62. B   63. D   64. A   65. C

 

 

 

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